Randolph-Lucas House

Preservation Partners in front of Randolph-Lucas HouseHistoric Randolph-Lucas House Moved to New Home in Ansley Park

On November 8, 2013, the historic Randolph-Lucas House was relocated from 2500 Peachtree Road in Buckhead to 78 Peachtree Circle in Ansley Park. The relocation was the culmination of nearly a year of planning on the part of Buckhead Heritage, NewTown Partners, the 2500 Peachtree Condominium Association, the City of Atlanta, and numerous other partners and contractors. NewTown Partners, an Atlanta-based economic development consulting firm focusing on distressed historic resources, purchased the Ansley Park property at 78 Peachtree Circle and subsequently financed the relocation of the house, which was donated by the Condominium Association. The mansion will serve as the private home of NewTown Partners’ founders, Christopher Jones and Roger Smith, returning the mansion to its residential roots for the first time in nearly 20 years.
 
 
 
 
For a Q&A about the Randolph-Lucas House Relocation Effort with Erica Danylchak, Executive Director of Buckhead Heritage, May 31, 2013, click here
 
For video interviews with project partners, May 31, 2013, click here.
 
For previous news stories, click here.
 

Image: Roger Smith, Christopher Jones, Wright Mitchell and Erica Danylchak stand on the porch of the historic Randolph-Lucas House.


View a Slide Show of Photos Chronicling the Disassembly & Relocation Process.

Photos provided by Bob Helget, Erica Danylchak, Brian Keiser, Wright Mitchell, and Tim Small.

 


Watch a time lapse video of the disassembly of the Randolph-Lucas House at 2500 Peachtree Road during the fall of 2013:

 


Why So Significant? 

Randolph-Lucas House Front ElevationThe Randolph-Lucas was designated a Historic Building – Exterior by the City of Atlanta in 1990 for its historic, cultural, and architectural significance.
 
The house was built in 1924 for Hollins Nicholas Randolph, a great, great grandson of Thomas Jefferson and a prominent Atlanta attorney in the early 20th century. P. Thornton Marye, a respected Atlanta architect in the early twentieth century, designed the house based on Randolph’s ancestral home “Dunlora” in Albemarle County, Virginia, where Randolph was born in 1872. Marye had moved to Atlanta in 1904 after being awarded the contract for Atlanta’s Terminal Station. He is also credited with the designs for St. Luke’s Episcopal Church (1906) and the Fox Theatre (1929) in Atlanta and other large-scale commissions throughout the southeast. The Randolph-Lucas house, however, is one of the few known extant examples of his residential work. The Randolph-Lucas House is also a rare surviving example of the grand residential mansions that lined Peachtree Road during the early 20th century in Atlanta.  
 
For more on architect P. Thornton Marye, read Wright Marshall's article, "Thornton Marye: A Cruel Twist of Fate."
 
Image: Randolph-Lucas House Front Elevation, Courtesy of Christopher Bailey.